Dr. Clay Siegall Shares His Passion For Sports

After his passion for curing people of cancer the chief executive officer of Seattle Genetics, Dr. Clay Siegall, has a passion for sports, football in particular. He writes about it often on his official blog. One recent story he wrote about was that The New York Jets appear to be very interested in the Oklahoma Sooners quarterback Baker Mayfield. They met with him before he played in the Senior Bowl and it’s entirely possible they’ll sign him in the draft if he is still available.

He also wrote about Quarterback Carson Wentz of the Philadelphia Eagles. He had been the teams starting quarterback but he tore his left LCL and his ACL ending his season. His backup, though, has played well enough that his team will be in the Super Bowl. He says in Dr. Clay Siegall’s article that it’s tough not being out on the field but he’s still trying to do his best to help the current quarterback succeed so that his team can hopefully beat the New England Patriots.

When Dr. Clay Siegall opened the doors of Seattle Genetics it was a very different world when it came to cancer treatment. Back then doctors used a lot of chemotherapy to treat cancer which kills cells that are cancerous and normal indiscriminately. The only hope with this is that they kill the cancerous cells without also killing the patient. His focus is on using antibody-drug conjugates to create targeted drug therapies that only kill cancerous cells. This is not only a lot more effective but they don’t also kill the patient.

Dr. Clay Siegall has been an executive in the biotechnology industry for many years. He also used to research and development for cancer drugs. His research led to him obtaining 15 patents and he has published more than 70 papers on cancer. Through strategic partnerships he has signed with other major players in the industry his firm now has over 20 cancer drugs in clinical development. In 2011 his company launched one called Adcetris though a partnership with Takeda Pharmaceutical Company. It is now curing people of lymphoma in 70 nations around the world.